config

Finding the OS version and Distribution in Linux

When supporting systems you have inherited or in environments that have many different OS versions and distributions of Linux. There are times when you simply don't know off hand what OS version or distribution the server you are logged into is. Luckily there is a simple way to figure that out. Ubuntu/Debian $ cat /etc/lsb-release DISTRIB_ID=Ubuntu DISTRIB_RELEASE=13.04 DISTRIB_CODENAME=raring DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Ubuntu 13.04" RedHat/CentOS/Oracle Linux # cat /etc/redhat-release Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server release 5 (Tikanga) Catchall If you are looking for a quick way and don't care what the output looks like, you can simply do this as well.

Creating a local Yum Repository

When it comes to package management on Red Hat based systems Yum (Yellowdog Updater, Modified) is my preferred method. It's a quick and easy way of installing desired rpm's and their dependencies as Yum will automatically resolve dependencies before installation. Most Red Hat base distributions include a public facing Yum repository that you can configure yum to use in order to save from having to maintain a local copy of every package on each system.

iptables: Linux firewall rules for a basic Web Server

For today's article I am going to explain how to create a basic firewall allow and deny filter list using the iptables package. We will be focused on creating a filtering rule-set for a basic everyday Linux web server running Web, FTP, SSH, MySQL, and DNS services. Before we begin lets get an understanding of iptables and firewall filtering in general. What is iptables? iptables is a package and kernel module for Linux that uses the netfilter hooks within the Linux kernel to provide filtering, network address translation, and packet mangling.

How to check if a cron job ran

Cron is a time based scheduled task daemon that runs on most common Unix/Linux distributions. Because cronjobs are time based sometimes it is necessary to validate that the job ran at the scheduled time. Sometimes people will configure a cron to send the output of the script to a user via system mail or redirect the output to a file; however not all crons are setup the same and many times they may be configured to send output to /dev/null hindering any ability to validate the job ran.