WAN

Adding and Troubleshooting Static Routes on Red Hat based Linux Distributions

Adding static routes in Linux can be troublesome, but also absolutely necessary depending on your network configuration. I call static routes troublesome because they can often be the cause of long troubleshooting sessions wondering why one server can't connect to another. This is especially true when dealing with teams that may not fully understand or know the remote servers IP configuration. The Default Route Linux, like any other OS has a routing table that determines what is the next hop for every packet.

Adding simulated network latency to your Linux server

Have you ever said to yourself, “man I really need to slow down my internet”? Probably not very often, but recently I found myself in a dilemma where I needed to simulate 120ms of network latency in my test environment which consists of servers that are racked right next to each other. That is where the command tc comes in. Within the current distributions of Linux there is a kernel component called netem, which adds Network Emulation and is used for testing and simulating the same types of issues one would see in a WAN (Wide Area Network).