red hat

Understanding a little more about /etc/profile and /etc/bashrc

Recently I was working on an issue where an application was not retaining the umask setting set in the root users profile or /etc/profile. After looking into the issue a bit it seemed that the application in question only applied the umask setting that was set in /etc/bashrc and would not even accept the values being the applications own start scripts. After doing a bit of researched I learned a little bit more about what exactly these files do, the differences between them and when they are executed.

mkisofs: Repackaging a Linux Install ISO

In the office I use Red Hat quite often and one of the quicker ways to provision a Red Hat server is via kickstart. There are many ways to reach a kickstart file during initial install (NFS, HTTP, FTP) but one of the ways I commonly use is to put the file on the installation DVD itself. The below steps are what I use to add a custom directory to the installation iso file.

ssh-keygen: Creating SSH Private/Public Keys

Are you tired of trying to memorize tons of passwords on different systems? Or do you simply want to have a faceless user SSH between two systems without being asked for a password? Well you are in luck because today we will be covering SSH keys. SSH Servers have the ability to authenticate users using public/private keys. In the case of pass-phrase less keys this allows users to ssh from one system to another without typing a password.

EMC PowerPath: superblock could not be read

Recently while working on a system that uses EMC PowerPath, I ran into a little issue after rebooting. The Issue fsck.ext3: No such file or directory while trying to open /dev/emcpowera1 /dev/emcpowera1: The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2 filesystem. The Cause The root cause of this issue is pretty simple when a Linux system boots it performs file system checks on file systems listed within the /etc/fstab file.

Securely backing up your files with rdiff-backup and sudo

Backups are important, whether you are backing up your databases or your wedding pictures. The loss of data can ruin your day. While there is a huge list of backup software to choose from; some good, some not so good. One of the tools that I have used for years is rdiff-backup. rdiff-backup is a rsync delta based backup tool that both stores a full mirror and incremental changes. It determines changes based on the rsync method of creating small delta files, which allows for rdiff-backup to restore files to any point in time (within the specified retention period).

Adding and Troubleshooting Static Routes on Red Hat based Linux Distributions

Adding static routes in Linux can be troublesome, but also absolutely necessary depending on your network configuration. I call static routes troublesome because they can often be the cause of long troubleshooting sessions wondering why one server can't connect to another. This is especially true when dealing with teams that may not fully understand or know the remote servers IP configuration. The Default Route Linux, like any other OS has a routing table that determines what is the next hop for every packet.

Creating a local Yum Repository

When it comes to package management on Red Hat based systems Yum (Yellowdog Updater, Modified) is my preferred method. It's a quick and easy way of installing desired rpm's and their dependencies as Yum will automatically resolve dependencies before installation. Most Red Hat base distributions include a public facing Yum repository that you can configure yum to use in order to save from having to maintain a local copy of every package on each system.